Have you suffered a concussion, been in an automobile accident, have dementia or memory loss challenges? Or maybe you’re wanting to optimize your thinking, and prevent Alzheimer’s?

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Welcome to The Brain and Behavior Clinic

We provide comprehensive care to people who have experienced concussions, sustained traumatic brain injuries, or are looking to optimize their cognitive function. The brain is the most complex organ in the body, so its response to injury is rarely isolated: it may emerge in a variety of cognitive, emotional, and physical ways.

Are you experiencing consistent headaches, unusually high levels of emotion, or weakened concentration? Are you having trouble sleeping, feeling irritable, or getting easily confused?

Any of these, and others, could be symptoms of a brain injury—especially if you’ve recently been in an accident.

We’re here because healing is possible.

Head Injury

Traumatic Brain Injury

Head Injury Treatment

You deserve a specialized individual treatment plan that will help you live free of post-concussion symptoms

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Age-Related Cognitive Decline

Alzheimer's Prevention

Healthy Brain Check-Up

It’s not too late to recover and to prevent cognitive decline. Prioritize your brain health and lead with your strongest self.

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Head Injury

Traumatic Brain Injury

Age-Related Cognitive Decline

Alzheimer's Prevention

Head Injury Treatment

You deserve a specialized individual treatment plan that will help you live free of post-concussion symptoms

Learn More

Healthy Brain Check-Up

It’s not too late to recover and to prevent cognitive decline. Prioritize your brain health and lead with your strongest self.

Learn More
brain

Who We Are

The Brain and Behavior Clinic was founded in 1985 by clinical neuropsychologist Dr. Stephen Schmitz, and has provided comprehensive neuropsychological care to patients ever since.

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Our Mission

The Brain and Behavior Clinic is committed to providing the highest quality neuropsychological testing, diagnosis, treatment, and neuro-educational services to our patients and the community we serve through knowledge, professionalism, and integrity.

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Frequently Asked Questions

traumatic brain injury occurs when the brain is subjected to trauma—whether struck by an object, pierced by an object, or shaken. Often incurred during car accidents or headfirst falls, TBIs can be categorized into three types—mild, moderate, and severe. Moderate and severe TBIs are often marked by prolonged loss of consciousness and bleeding in the brain, while mild TBIs—most commonly referred to as concussions—are typically characterized by a brief period of loss of consciousness, confusion, feeling dazed, and/or slowed processing.

While these symptoms usually resolve within a day or two, sometimes thinking problems persist, resulting in what is called Post Concussion Syndrome.

Post-concussion syndrome refers to a constellation of symptoms that arise and persist after a concussion has been sustained. Though the damage incurred from a concussion is often thought to be fairly benign, and is typically not observable on CT or MRI, if prolonged it can cause significant problems in multiple aspects of a person’s life. Post Concussion Syndrome is characterized by physical, emotional, and cognitive (thinking) problems, which all interact with each other, resulting in an overall worsening of a person’s ability to function in their life.

Post-concussion syndrome looks different for everyone, but common symptoms include memory impairment, attention and concentration problems, slowed processing, emotional or cognitive overwhelm, lack of motivation, depression, anxiety, headaches, and fatigue. If you’re experiencing any of these or other recent changes to your physical; cognitive; or behavioral health, a treatment consultation may help you find answers and lead you to a path of recovery.

At the Brain and Behavior Clinic, treatment begins with a thorough evaluation to determine the extent of any cognitive compromise you may have experienced. An individualized treatment program, involving a combination of cognitive rehabilitation, trauma counseling, and possibly medications to improve sleep and processing speed is prescribed and administered. Typically, patients recover and return to optimal brain function within three to six months.

Specializing in the relationship between the physical brain and behavior, a neuropsychologist conducts an assessment of the brain using various paper/pencil and computerized tests to measure how it is functioning. Neuropsychologists are trained in both neurology (the “hardware” of the brain) and psychology (the “software” or programming of the brain) because a brain injury (like a concussion) or disease process (like Alzheimer’s) can affect both areas. They typically start with a comprehensive interview, administer the test measures, and then give clear feedback to the person about their findings. Recommendations can include brain exercises, life-style changes, cognitive rehabilitation, medications, and counseling from a brain specialist.

Neuropsychological testing is an evaluation of organic brain function compared to a person’s same age, gender, and educational level peer group. Typically, an evaluation begins with an interview to ascertain the patient’s ability to perform daily tasks, identify memory issues and mental health concerns, and acquire basic medical information. Next, a series of paper and computer tests is administered to measure relative memory and cognitive ability, identify personality traits, and assess emotional wellbeing.

If you feel that you are falling behind cognitively, processing more slowly than you used to, or are simply not feeling like yourself, your brain health is not at its optimum, and your cognitive function is likely suffering as a result. If you’ve been experiencing persistent anxiety or depression, the resulting stress to the brain may be causing subtle cognitive decline, as well. If you’re unsure of your brain’s health status, we can help you determine deficiencies and achieve the optimal function your brain is capable of.

Alzheimer’s disease is preceded by early dementia stages—Subjective Cognitive Impairment (SCI) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). SCI refers to self-identified cognitive changes that can’t be perceived by other people; and MCI refers to cognitive changes that can be perceived by other people but that only mildly impact one’s functionality. Both SCI and MCI may be early signs of Alzheimer’s disease, but not necessarily. A competent neuropsychological evaluation can clarify the diagnosis and provide critical information leading to appropriate treatment to arrest or potentially slow the disease process.

If Alzheimer’s disease has been in your family, you may be at a heightened risk. However, the risk is alterable, and you can take preventative action. Beyond genetic predisposition, there are a number of holistic health factors that can contribute to cognitive decline—all of which can be addressed and altered. Dr. Dale Bredesen—internationally recognized pioneer in neurological research and founder of the The Bredesen Protocol—has discovered 36 factors that can contribute to cognitive decline, including nutritional status, metabolic functioning, sleep habits, and stress management. When identified and addressed early on, related risk factors can be reduced in prevention of Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases.

Effective treatment of the brain relies on a functional approach to the health of the whole person. That’s why we employ a wide range of therapies when addressing brain health—whether treating a traumatic brain injury, reversing age-related cognitive decline, or slowing the progression Alzheimer’s disease. While treatment looks different for every individual, it can involve any combination of nutritional, cognitive, behavioral, psychological, medicines and/or supplements or other occupational therapies.

With age, forgetfulness that does not interfere with a person’s ability to function on a day-to-day basis can be considered normal. If memory loss does become debilitating, harmful, or excessive, it is not a normal part of aging. This abnormal level of memory loss is generally referred to as Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Though not always clear, there are ways to distinguish between age-related memory changes and abnormal memory problems. Memory problems associated with MCI are more frequent and invasive than normal forgetfulness, and are generally noticeable by others in your life.

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It’s not too late to recover and to prevent cognitive decline
The key to cognitive longevity is early action

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